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[Ubuntu] Finding my WiFi card

Discussion in 'Bits & Bytes' started by Stiofan, May 25, 2007.

  1. Stiofan

    Stiofan Master Po

    I can only use my Linux OS when wired to a lan as it doesn't see any WiFi card in my system. At least none is listed in the device manager that I can see. How do I get it to show up and where do I get a driver for it?

    It's got a generic Broadcomm 802.11g card.
     
  2. Biker

    Biker Administrator Staff Member

  3. Stiofan

    Stiofan Master Po

    Cool, thanks, I'm off to read it.
     
  4. Stiofan

    Stiofan Master Po

    Bummer, didn't work. Tutorial is only for a system which sees the card in the first place. Mine doesn't.

    I'll look around there some more.
     
  5. Stiofan

    Stiofan Master Po

    Well, that's it. After spending 30 minutes working with a 1981 era command line interface trying do the simplist things like move files around, find and run something called ndiswrapper, because you can't do it graphically since everything is locked down, I'm done. Maybe I'll try again in a few weeks, maybe never, but this is stupid imo to spend one's time doing something the OS should have built in. (No offense to anyone here who likes this stuff, I simply don't).
     
  6. Biker

    Biker Administrator Staff Member

    I'll dig up a how to on ndiswrapper.... It really isn't that difficult.
     
  7. Biker

    Biker Administrator Staff Member

    Heh.. Just looked at the source project, and they have extensive documentation and the latest source files for ndiswrapper. Might want to check it out here.
     
  8. Stiofan

    Stiofan Master Po

    I got it downloaded, but then it said I had to make a folder for it. Using the instructions, it simply wouldn't do it. I tried to do it without the command line and no go. The entire thing is really too much for someone without the time to really get into it.

    I do appreciate your help but don't knock yourself out about it if you're busy with other stuff. I can have a go at it later maybe.

    Edit: just saw your last post, I'll head over to that link.
     
  9. Stiofan

    Stiofan Master Po

    I'm going to close this out. I've been working all day on and off trying to get this thing to work and no go. The last link above just sends me back to the first link posted, which following their instructions doesn't work for me. I've found a number of other posts at various places trying to do the same thing and can't get it to work properly from those either.

    Without wireless it's worthless for me and I don't want anyone to spend anymore time on it especially myself. With the installed boot loader it's going to be a bitch to reclaim my linux partition for windows but thems the breaks.
     
  10. eakes

    eakes Registered User

    Just for information: ndiswrapper is present in Ubuntu and can be added from the Synaptic package manager under "administration". Scroll the available packages and check it to be added. When all is done one has a GUI to add Windows drivers.
     
  11. Stiofan

    Stiofan Master Po

    I have no idea what you just said.

    ndiswrapper is on the install disk, I found it there, but it would not install properly. Anyway, it's over.
     
  12. eakes

    eakes Registered User

    I understand you have had your fill of Linux for now, but just in case you get the urge again ...

    From the menu bar select System, then Administrative. In the resulting list you will find Synaptic Package manager. Select that and there will be a window pop up indicating the 'packages' that are installed (those with "check" marks) and those available to be installed (empty boxes by the title). Select All on the left, then scroll the list in the right hand window (there are a lot of 'packages', they are in alphabetic order) until you come to ndiswrapper and ndispk. Click on those to install. Follow the resulting pop-up window prompts and you will get a new item in the Administrative list named "Windows Wireless Drivers". If you then select this item you will be prompted for the location of the driver you want to load (must be .inf file). Once you have loaded the file and rebooted your wireless device should be recognized.

    Otherwise, you can just skip all this and load Mandriva. It is a little more sophisticated and a little friendlier to us weekend dabblers in Linux. Load Mandriva and if your wireless card is attached it should be recognized immediately - at least my Belkin USB device was recognized at startup. All that was necessary was to configure the connection parameters for the wireless router and it was connected.
     
  13. Coot

    Coot Passed Away January 7, 2010

    Quck question, is there a quick and dirty way to mount my NTFS partition in Ubuntu so that I could quickly copy the broadcom driver from the windows system directory?
     
  14. Biker

    Biker Administrator Staff Member

  15. eakes

    eakes Registered User

    My quick and dirty method would be to copy the file to a RW cd, then read the file from the cd while booted in Ubuntu.
     
  16. Stiofan

    Stiofan Master Po

    Eakes, I really want to thank you (and Biker as well again) for being so patient. I may try and take another stab at it later. Without internet access at home the OS is worthless for me, but everything else seems to work. Part of the problem is that unless I can get it working, there's nothing for me to do with this OS so I can't really experiment and learn about it, getting used to the quirks.

    Thanks again.
     
  17. Coot

    Coot Passed Away January 7, 2010

    My card is the one in the linked article that says it probably won't work with that solution and it doesn't.

    I've opened the package manager and there simply are no packages that show as uninstalled. Every bleeping one of them shows as installed. If I filter for not installed, the list returns 0 packages. If I search for ndiswrapper, it returns only the linux kernel and poking around at that and I get a prompt that says recompiling the kernel is a dangerous operation.

    I'll give the ubuntu folks this, other than the wireless clusterfuck, it is a sweet distro. Too bad I can't just leave my laptop on the kitchen counter and run hardwired to the router. If I ever get my desktop machine set back up, I'll definitely run this.

    Ah well, off to find a distro that will allow my wireless to work. Never been a big fan of Mandrake. :/
     
  18. Stiofan

    Stiofan Master Po

    Let me know what you find.
     
  19. eakes

    eakes Registered User

    Coot. I can think of two possibilities for the difference: either the distro I downloaded is different from yours or during the install process the installer loaded the additional packages. I do recall that near the end of the install there is an on-screen message that it is looking for something to download. If one does not have an internet connection during the install, the program obviously could not download whatever it looks for.

    Quite frankly, even after the Windows drivers are installed, wireless connection with Ubu' is flakey. I haven't been able to get it to work on either of the two machines I loaded Ubu on.

    As I said earlier, Mandriva is much more polished than Ubu. I have Mandriva on the same two machines that I loaded Ubu on and in both cases wireless was ready to go as soon as the install was completed. (I have Ubu and Mandriva on different HDs - I just connect the appropriate HD depending on which install I decide to 'play' with).

    I am a Mac user (since 1985), Winduhs, Linux, etc is just something to play with.
     
  20. Stiofan

    Stiofan Master Po

    What exactly is a switch to this other flavor going to entail? I have my primary partition of about 90g for Windows, and a 30g for Ubuntu. It installs their boot program, so do I have to do a complete repartition after removign Ubunto first, or can I simply use the the present 30g partition and install Mandriva there, and if so will the Ubuntu boot program recognize it?
     

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