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[Split from Philosophy forum] Is the idea we came from space aliens any more valid...

Discussion in 'Issues Around the World' started by Techie2000, Dec 30, 2002.

  1. Techie2000

    Techie2000 The crowd would sing:

    An interesting idea. Evolution can certainly be applied to it, but we still don't know what created whatever it is evolved into the Gods. I guess it all comes down to the chicken and the egg.
     
  2. Coot

    Coot Passed Away January 7, 2010

    If you've taken a close look at Brigitte Boisselier, the clonaid lady, any doubts that at least some of us came from aliens should be soundly put to rest.
     
  3. Steve

    Steve Is that it, then?

    LOL, Coot!

    Techie, the old "chicken or egg" argument is as good a one as any. I'm a firm believer in evolution, but even that has limits. Sure, life could have spontaneously arisen from some primordial soup. But where did the Universe come from? The Big Bang? What caused the Big Bang? Too many questions, too few answers....
     
  4. RRedline

    RRedline Veteran MMember

    Techie, I believe that the Raelians' beliefs are at least as credible as traditional religious ones are.

    Stevent is wise to point out that even if the Raelians are responsible for creating and putting us here, that alone does not rule out that there is a supreme creator. Where did the Elohim come from?

    If we were placed here by aliens, that would explain the missing link. Perhaps "we" never evolved after all(at least not from a much more primitive species)? Of course, that doesn't mean that the Elohim didn't evolve from single cell organisms somewhere else in the universe.

    Fairy tale or not, this belief is no more ridiculous than the belief in Ptah, Zeus, Odin, Allah, Vishnu, God or Zod. At least, not to me, it isn't.
     
  5. RRedline

    RRedline Veteran MMember

    And even if God is responsible for everything, there is still the question, "Where did God come from?"

    We don't really have any answers...only questions.
     
  6. Steve

    Steve Is that it, then?

    "Wise", eh? No one's ever called me "wise", before. Sure you didn't mean "wiseguy"? :)
     
  7. HaYwIrE

    HaYwIrE Banned

    I find some validity in the theory that extraterrestrials may have had something to do with the evolution of mankind in that science has never been able to explain "<i>the missing link</i>" in that evolution.
     
  8. Steve

    Steve Is that it, then?

    There is growing support for a sort of "hyper-evolution" theory.

    Traditional evolutionary theory holds that natural selection due to environmental pressures and genetic mutations occurs at a slow, steady, non-varying pace.

    "Hyper-evolution" (my phrase, sorry I can't recall exactly what it's labeled) posits that evolution can and does occur in leaps and bounds; that there are periods of little, or no, evolutionary development; periods of incredibly fast development; and periods of slow, steady development.

    Study of the fossil record, with discoveries averaged over hundreds of thousands of years, reveals a long, slow steady pace of development. It's analagous to viewing a graph of stock market activity where the scale is decades; it all looks to be a fairly smooth upward trend. Zooming in to a yearly scale, or even monthly, however, clearly shows the actual ups and downs that occur.

    So, "hyper-evolution" would account for the so-called "missing link" by allowing for a "jump" from a relatively undeveloped species to a relatively developed one. There would be little, or no, fossil record of such a jump because it would have taken place in a relatively short period of time, thus creating a gap in the record. Let me see if I can find a link.....
     
  9. Steve

    Steve Is that it, then?

    OK, here we go. Sorry about the cheesy page background.

    Anyway, the two key terms are "gradualism" and "punctuated equilibrium". Gradualism is the slow, steady process, and punctuated equilibrium is slow, or no, change over long periods of time, followed by rapid evolution.
     
  10. HaYwIrE

    HaYwIrE Banned

    But even such a leap would have had to take hundreds or thousands of years. Surely there would be <b>SOME</b> evidence of this. :huh:
     
  11. Steve

    Steve Is that it, then?

    The theory is that the changes could take place over decades and be so dramatic in scope as to present the appearance of a completely new species from out of nowhere.
     
  12. Steve

    Steve Is that it, then?

  13. Steve

    Steve Is that it, then?

    I thought it was appropriate to split the discussion to this form, given the direction it's taken.
     
  14. Sunriser13

    Sunriser13 Knee Deep in Paradise

  15. Steve

    Steve Is that it, then?

    Thanks for the great links! You want I should just delete the other post?
     
  16. Sunriser13

    Sunriser13 Knee Deep in Paradise

    That would be great!! :)
     
  17. Steve

    Steve Is that it, then?

    Interesting to see and read the link to stephenjaygould.org.

    I probably picked up on the whole concept while reading one of his essays in "Leonardo's Mountain of Clams and the Diet of Worms : Essays on Natural History".
     
  18. Sunriser13

    Sunriser13 Knee Deep in Paradise

    I agree that Gould is fascinating. One of the things I especially appreciate about his writing is that you don't need a PhD to understand it!

    Where I see this possibly explaining the missing link, so to speak, is that evolutionary species in different stages of development could coexist, thereby blurring the archaeological reconstruction. In other words, are you really, really sure that particular patella went with that tibia??? :haha:
     
  19. Steve

    Steve Is that it, then?

    Good point. I've read that the likelihood of evolutionarily different species actually surviving is likely to have been much greater in smaller, isolated sub-populations. That way the changes in the genome will have been less likely to have been absorbed back into the general, larger population on non-evolved individuals.
     
  20. Sunriser13

    Sunriser13 Knee Deep in Paradise

    Well, we've got some pretty non-evolved specimens here... let's ask them!!

    [mover]<small>Sunriser runs away, cackling madly...</small>[/mover]

    :angel:
     

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