1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

"Made in America"

Discussion in 'Society and Culture' started by ethics, Apr 2, 2018.

  1. ethics

    ethics Pomp-Dumpster Staff Member

    What if the product sucks?

    Here's my beef, the Chinese are making almost everything, their entire economy was propped up MOSTLY because of America (they've expanded everywhere else now). So when we get MAGA chants, why aren't we making better products?

    8fv8odwsuhp01.jpg
     
    Susan Addams likes this.
  2. BigDeputyDog

    BigDeputyDog Straight Shootin Admin Staff Member

    2007 Hyundai Sonata Limited headlight out - Replacement bulb $12, 15 minutes from start to finish

    2009 Cadillac DTS headlight out - Remove bumper fascia, remove grill, remove headlight bucket, replace light, reinstall headlight bucket, reinstall grill, reinstall bumper fascia, $350, 4 hour job
     
  3. ethics

    ethics Pomp-Dumpster Staff Member


    That's..... depressing. And says everything about what the hell is wrong and the direction this country is going.
     
  4. Allene

    Allene Registered User

    I thought GE stopped making replacement parts. I had a gas GE cooktop, and something happened to something in one of the burners. We called someone from a local appliance place to check on it because it was leaking gas, so we had to shut it down. He came over to our house, determined something or other had broken, and told us GE no longer supplied parts, so we had to get another cooktop from a different manufacturer.
     
  5. MemphisMark

    MemphisMark Old School Conservative

    Unfortunately, the cycle for Planned Obsolesce is getting shorter and shorter.

    Also, I have said since the 80's that a technician needs to be part of the engineering group for any equipment, because engineers don't think about the schmuck (that's me!) that has to develop extra joints in their arms and fingers to get to a certain part. The only other way would be to spend 3x the time that it should take to just about disassemble the entire unit.

    I have a $25 part in one of my modules that is a consumable part. The problem is you have to pull on a usually-jammed and hard-to-pull tab to depress the spring-loaded drive wheel, then use a curved awl to pop it out. The bad part is the top end of that module only lifts up 2", so you have to go in only by feel and pop it out. The newest generation module the lid opens enough, but they eliminated that part.....
     
  6. Allene

    Allene Registered User

    Frustrating, isn't it!
     
  7. Allene

    Allene Registered User

    On a more cheerful note, I have a 20-year-old Maytag drier. I had a Maytag washer that died the day before it's 25th birthday. They don't make them the way they used to for sure.
     
  8. ShinyTop

    ShinyTop I know what is right or wrong!

    I have a washer and dryer bought in 1983 that are still running. No repairs ever. Kenmore.
     
    ethics and Allene like this.
  9. Biker

    Biker Administrator Staff Member

    My truck is similar, only I don't pay a dealer to do it. Remove the trim, then 3 bolts holding the headlight assembly. Pop it all out, replace the bulb and put it all back together. Sure the dealer would want a couple of hundred bucks to do it.

    I have to replace the fuel injectors as well. That's about a 2 hour job that I keep putting off. Really should get it done as it's starting to get warm out and the car doesn't have AC (that's another repair job I have to do and replace the AC compressor).
     
    ethics likes this.
  10. Arc

    Arc Full Member

    You do know that you are not limited to washing your clothes annually, right? :p
     
    cmhbob, ShinyTop and Allene like this.
  11. BigDeputyDog

    BigDeputyDog Straight Shootin Admin Staff Member

    I'm glad that you are able to do it yourself, Tom! For me, that is not an option. My mind says I have the knowledge to do it but my body will not cooperate. Fingers with no feeling or fine motor skills, broken sternum, arthritis... You get the picture!
     
  12. Andy

    Andy ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ

    My theory isn't very popular, and starts a lot of arguments with my wife who belongs to one, but I believe it's because of those organizations that starts with a "U" and has drifted more towards taking care of itself rather than it's members in the last ~30 years.
     
  13. ethics

    ethics Pomp-Dumpster Staff Member

    Unions? I am sure that's definitely part of it. No secret I've been anti-union for decades. Want proof? Come to NYC and see them in action. From construction to MTA.
     
  14. Arc

    Arc Full Member

    Actually, it has always been that way, even in the days when unions and union memberships and union negotiated wages and benefits were at the highest.

    Unions at their peeks were always for themselves first and foremost. After all, they were a business. But in their heyday, their business interests and that of the workers' needs or desires coincided. Unfortunately, when economic and social circumstances evolved the unions lost the majority of what was at their peak a huge clout of power over industries or businesses in the USA. When they lost that there began what has evolved into a gap between what is in the union's interest and the workers they represent.
     
    ethics likes this.
  15. ethics

    ethics Pomp-Dumpster Staff Member

    So hasn't the Unions taking it up the wazoo in the last 20 - 30 years? There's been less and less of them so why is the quality getting worse of US made products?
     
  16. Biker

    Biker Administrator Staff Member

    Because workers no longer have pride in workmanship or loyalty to the company they're working for. It's a job, and as long as they're getting a paycheck for mediocre work, they don't give a shit.
     
  17. ethics

    ethics Pomp-Dumpster Staff Member

    I am with you so far. What has changed?
     
  18. BigDeputyDog

    BigDeputyDog Straight Shootin Admin Staff Member

    The companies no longer have loyalty to their workers. Instead of rewarding employees who have the knowledge and experience and giving them a raise, the company will hire someone off the streets at a lesser pay and expect the seasoned veteran to teach them their job.

    BDD
     
    Allene likes this.
  19. ShinyTop

    ShinyTop I know what is right or wrong!

    I think the manufacturers have cut back on quality control. Even if workers are not as conscientious as in previous generations good QC would stop the bad items before they leave the factory. Good QC should include bad marks against the sections making bad product and have financial and job longevity penalties.
     
  20. Biker

    Biker Administrator Staff Member

    Corporations also expect you to be the jack of all trades. Specialization went bye-bye after the dot com bubble burst back in the 90s. In addition, you're expected to work your ass off with minimal pay and when you start balking, you're replaced by a kid who doesn't know squat. But the company doesn't care as there are dozens of others who'll gladly take the job.
     
  21. ethics

    ethics Pomp-Dumpster Staff Member

    So the summary is that the corporations have changed. Ever since "Globalization" and that fucktard of an idiot from NY TIMES Thomas Friedman -- he wrote "An Olive Tree and a Lexus" and how Globalization will help the world.

    So let me get this one a bit more summarized.

    The entire 3rd world like India, China, Africa -- to some extent -- have been propped up on the backs of ... NOT THE US Corporations, but on the backs of the US Worker. Meaning that it's the US worker whom paid the big price of corporate loyalty, pensions, and down right compensation.

    And that, my fellow friends, is the root of the evil (at least my theory). Because -- and I speak from the tech world spectrum -- this did not exist before we were flooded with H1B visa entry from India and China. It was before we've decided to put our pride in our product and just gave up the for the cheaper labor.
     
    Allene likes this.

Share This Page