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Iphone Disappointments

Discussion in 'Bits & Bytes' started by ethics, Jul 1, 2007.

  1. Kangaroo

    Kangaroo Passed Away June 15th, 2009


    Yeah, cause a there are NO other costs associated with the product. Oh, maybe the box. No wonder geeks aren't allowed to be in charge of companies anymore.
     
  2. tke711

    tke711 Oink Oink Staff Member

    I understand that, but I have a hard time believing that Apple told at&t to NOT sell the phones to business customers. That has to be an at&t decision only.
     
  3. Biker

    Biker Administrator Staff Member

    From what I understand, Apple wanted the initial load to go to consumers only. Hell, even I don't get a discount and the damned thing.
     
  4. tke711

    tke711 Oink Oink Staff Member

    That makes NO sense to me, but of course you very well could be right. I'll be talking to by business account lady later this morning, not that it will probably get me anywhere, but I'll let you know what I find out.
     
  5. tke711

    tke711 Oink Oink Staff Member

    My thoughts exactly Kang. Yep, it's easy for people to make those statements when they assume there's no R&D costs to recoup, no assembly costs, no marketing costs, no packaging costs, no shipping costs, etc.

    I'm sure Apple is making a profit on the phone, but so what. After all, their in business to make money. :)
     
  6. Biker

    Biker Administrator Staff Member

    Business accounts aren't going to get any right now. First thing she's going to ask is if you wish to break your business account out into a personal account.
     
  7. tke711

    tke711 Oink Oink Staff Member

    Which ain't going to happen, but at least it will make me feel better to lay into her a little bit. :)
     
  8. ravital

    ravital Banned

    Absolutely. God bless capitalism and all capitalists. Apple deserves to make money.

    It's just that, this thread (and at least one other) has done an excellent job of listing the limitations and drawbacks of the product, and of course, any product is going to have pros and cons, but some of us feel that with all the cons this one has, all the limitations, all the disappointments, well, I have to wonder, what's so capitalist about charging so much for so little?

    Sure, many people will enjoy the product and put it to good use, and feel they're getting their money's worth. That's fine. I personally feel my money is worth a bit more than that, especially a bit more than what you described in the battery "replacement" procedure. I don't feel I should spend that kind of money for something the vendor is planning to make me want to replace in two years. Nothing wrong with anyone who does invest in such a product, I just don't feel it's right for me to get into that cycle. For contrast, my 60Gb MP3 player is not a camera, not a PDA, not a dishwasher, not a video player. It does what it was designed to do, it does it well, and if I take good care of it, it will continue to do so till after I die. No false promises, no disappointments. No $500-$600 either. That, too, is capitalism. :)
     
  9. ravital

    ravital Banned

    Even better, according to the link Gregg posted, you need to back up your data on iTunes before you send in your phone. Now it makes sense that you should be responsible for your own backups, but why do you have to put them on an external site where it's out of your control? All your contacts, everybody's phone number whom you've ever called or who called you - on their site. Why?
     
  10. tke711

    tke711 Oink Oink Staff Member

    Engadget's review is out. It's a 3 page read, but one of the better ones I've found.

    Here's their conclusion (but read the rest for much more detail):
    [bl]Wrap-up

    We're not huge fans of "conclusions" in reviews -- or number systems, or one liner pros / cons / bottom-lines for that matter. Devices have become so feature-rich over the years that potential buyers' decisions can be made or broken on the support, quality, or integration of just one or two features. For us that's exactly the case with the iPhone -- although the list of things it doesn't do is as long as the list of things it does, it's only a few small, but severe, issues about the device that truly galvanizes our opinion of it.

    It's easy to see the device is extraordinarily simple to use for such a full-featured phone and media player. Apple makes creating the spartan, simplified UI look oh so easy -- but we know it's not, and the devil's always in the details when it comes to portables. To date no one's made a phone that does so much with so little, and despite the numerous foibles of the iPhone's gesture-based touchscreen interface, the learning curve is surprisingly low. It's totally clear that with the iPhone, Apple raised the bar not only for the cellphone, but for portable media players and multifunction convergence devices in general.

    But getting things done with the iPhone isn't easy, and anyone looking for a productivity device will probably need to look on. Its browser falls pretty short of the "internet in your pocket" claims Apple's made, and even though it's still easily the most advanced mobile browser on the market, its constant crashing doesn't exactly seal the deal. The iPhone's Mail app -- from its myriad missing features to its un-integrated POP mail experience to its obsolete method of accessing your Gmail -- makes email on the iPhone a huge chore at best.

    For us, the most interesting thing about the iPhone is its genesis and position in the market. Apple somehow managed to convince one of the most conservative wireless carriers in the world, AT&T (then Cingular), not only to buy into its device sight-unseen, but to readjust its whole philosophy of how a device and carrier should work together (as evidenced by the radically modernized and personalized activation process). Only a few days after launch it's easy to see June 29th as a watershed moment that crystalized the fact that consumers will pay more for a device that does more -- and treats them like a human being, not a cellphone engineer. Imagine that.

    But is the iPhone worth the two year contract with the oft-maligned AT&T and its steep price of admission? Hopefully we gave you enough information about the iPhone's every detail to make an informed decision -- despite the iPhone's many shortcomings, we suspect the answer for countless consumers will be a resounding yes.[/bl]

    I was very disappointed to read the details for the iPhone email apps and how painful it was for the Engadget folks to use. Maybe this explains why at&t won't sell the phone to business users right now.

    To be honest, like Engadget, the lack of email functionality is deal breaker for me as well. Hopefully, Apple will add ActiveSync and improve the functionality in future updates. If they do, I'll be back on board again. :)
     
  11. tke711

    tke711 Oink Oink Staff Member

    There really is no need to "backup" your data, it would already be in iTunes unless the user manually added a new contact to the iPhone after his last sync.
     
  12. Biker

    Biker Administrator Staff Member

    Are you nuts? Why on earth would Apple toss functionality for a Microsoft product onto the device?

    This has been one of the huge issues with the Apple products in that backing them up requires specialized software made just by Apple. Want to make a hit with the users? Add micro SD card functionality and include a routine that allows you to back your info to the card.
     
  13. ravital

    ravital Banned

    There ya go :) . That's the real value of Apple in the marketplace. Setting the standard and raising them.

    If not for Apple, we'd all be using DOS 27.4 right now, and portable music would still be a cassette in a walkman, or a CD in a portable player. At the same time, corporations who imagine that people will buy their products simply because they love them, need to readjust their attitudes a little (you used to pay an average $800 more for a Compaq computer for no reason other than the name, and we all know how that ended up).
     
  14. tke711

    tke711 Oink Oink Staff Member

    It's been reported in the WSJ and the NYT that Apple and Microsoft have worked out a licensing deal for ActiveSync.

    What is there to backup on Apple products that already isn't in iTunes? Rav made the same point above and I think I'm obviously missing what both of you are trying to say. With my iPod, and the iPhone, all the data is synced with both the unit and iTunes, so the data is constantly in two places, or backed up.
     
  15. ravital

    ravital Banned

    My point on that is, why does your private info from your phone (which means also other people's private info if it includes their numbers, addresses etc), why does it need to be on an external site?

    If I misunderstand how iTunes works, sorry, I take it back, but from what I read in your link about the battery non-replacement procedure, you have to have all that data on iTunes before you send the phone in, so you can load it back on the one they send you back.
     
  16. Biker

    Biker Administrator Staff Member

    The problem with iTunes is its insistence on calling home to momma.
     
  17. tke711

    tke711 Oink Oink Staff Member

    The iPhone syncs contact info with Outlook (or other contact software) so I'm not sure that the actual information ever goes to an external site.

    You would have to sync all your data THROUGH iTunes before having it replaced, but it's probably a non-issue because it's something that most users will be doing frequently anyway. iTunes is simply the software interface that the iPhone (or iPod's) use to sync data between your PC and the device.
     
  18. tke711

    tke711 Oink Oink Staff Member

    I've been using iTunes and my iPod for quite some time, and other then checking for software updates and accessing their online store, iTunes doesn't dial home to momma any more then Microsoft (or any other software for that matter) does.
     
  19. Biker

    Biker Administrator Staff Member

    True, however, with iTunes creating the critical link of safeguarding your personal info, I'm not wild about ANY attempt to call home.
     
  20. tke711

    tke711 Oink Oink Staff Member

    Fair enough, but I don't worry about it. After all, Microsoft has a worse track record at security and I still put on my contact info in Outlook. ;)

    Plus, it's not like my social security number and/or credit card numbers will be stored anywhere on my iPod or iPhone.
     

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