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Grammar Questions

Discussion in 'Issues Around the World' started by ethics, Aug 20, 2004.

  1. rockotman

    rockotman Blown on the steel breeze

    It's amazing that people can remember the proper use of the apostrophe, when its purpose is as varied as it is in the english language.

    Note how stupid the above sentence would sound if the last bolded phrase was a contraction instead of being two distinct words.
     
  2. ethics

    ethics Pomp-Dumpster Staff Member

    Actually both those examples are correct. In the first example, the question gets answered of "whose phone directory?" Why, the company's! Second example you are using a possesive its. And you are right. If you can substitute it is or it has with it's, then you are golden. :)



    Don't get me started.
     
  3. ravital

    ravital Banned

    Phew! Well thank you all for the feedback, I was actually worried... :cool:

    Just a side-note: As difficult and irrational as English may appear to be, trust me folks, as a former expert in the French and Hebrew grammars and a somewhat fluent Spanish speaker, you don't know how easy English is until you try to tackle a language where nouns, adjectives, pronouns, verbs, and possessives have genders.
     
  4. SixofNine

    SixofNine Jedi Sage Staff Member

    [quote name='ravital] Just a side-note: As difficult and irrational as English may appear to be, trust me folks, as a former expert in the French and Hebrew grammars and a somewhat fluent Spanish speaker, you don't know how easy English is until you try to tackle a language where nouns, adjectives, pronouns, verbs, and possessives have [i']genders.[/i][/quote]

    Yeah, and I don't know about Hebrew but the subjunctive mood gets much more of a workout in the romance languages, too.

    Brian
     
  5. ethics

    ethics Pomp-Dumpster Staff Member

    Here I agree. While the Russian language is seared in to my head, I still catch my self and wonder how "stylka"(chair) is a she but "pol" (floor) is a he. ;)
     
  6. joseftu

    joseftu ORIGINAL Pomp-Dumpster

    Shall we begin to speak of Latin?

    (No, let's not! :))
     
  7. SixofNine

    SixofNine Jedi Sage Staff Member

    "Seared?" Did you learn Russian in Cambodia? rofl

    Brian
     
  8. ethics

    ethics Pomp-Dumpster Staff Member

    Today's ESPN's Insider edition on Basketball showdown:

    If Team USA beats Spain and Argentina, it likely will face a rematch with either Italy, Puerto Rico and Lithuania.

    Shouldn't that be: If Team USA beats Spain and Argentina, it likely will face a rematch with either Italy, Puerto Rico or Lithuania.
     
  9. Copzilla

    Copzilla dangerous animal Staff Member

    Yes. "Either" requires an "or".
     
  10. Fiona

    Fiona Veteran Member

    yes, " "Either now or later... Neither now nor ever"
    Hey that's clever!
    (Conjunction junction strikes again!)
     
  11. ethics

    ethics Pomp-Dumpster Staff Member

    Cool thanks. :)
     
  12. Fiona

    Fiona Veteran Member

    I think it's now appropriate to paste the words to "Conjunction Junction"
    That way several questions are already answered...
    ...and it's a snappy little tune. ;)


    Conjunction Junction, what's your function?
    Hooking up words and phrases and clauses.
    Conjunction Junction, how's that function?
    I got three favorite cars
    That get most of my job done.
    Conjunction Junction, what's their function?
    I got "and", "but", and "or",
    They'll get you pretty far.

    "And":
    That's an additive, like "this and that".
    "But":
    That's sort of the opposite,
    "Not this but that".
    And then there's "or":
    O-R, when you have a choice like
    "This or that".
    "And", "but", and "or",
    Get you pretty far.

    Conjunction Junction, what's your function?
    Hooking up two boxcars and making 'em run right.
    Milk and honey, bread and butter, peas and rice.
    Hey that's nice!
    Dirty but happy, digging and scratching,
    Losing your shoe and a button or two.
    He's poor but honest, sad but true,
    Boo-hoo-hoo-hoo-hoo!

    Conjunction Junction, what's your function?
    Hooking up two cars to one
    When you say something like this choice:
    "Either now or later"
    Or no choice:
    "Neither now nor ever"
    Hey that's clever!
    Eat this or that, grow thin or fat,
    Never mind, I wouldn't do that,
    I'm fat enough now!

    Conjunction Junction, what's your function?
    Hooking up phrases and clauses that balance, like:
    Out of the frying pan and into the fire.
    He cut loose the sandbags,
    But the balloon wouldn't go any higher.
    Let's go up to the mountains,
    Or down to the sea.
    You should always say "thank you",
    Or at least say "please".

    Conjunction Junction, what's your function?
    Hooking up words and phrases and clauses
    In complex sentences like:

    Conjunction Junction, what's your function?
    Hooking up cars and making 'em function.
    Conjunction Junction, how's that function?
    I like tying up words and phrases and clauses.
    Conjunction Junction, watch that function.
    I'm going to get you there if you're very careful.
    Conjunction Junction, what's your function?
    I'm going to get you there if you're very careful.
    Conjunction Junction, what's your function?
    I'm going to get you there if you're very careful.


    from SchoolhouseRock.tv
     
  13. ethics

    ethics Pomp-Dumpster Staff Member

    Another one.

    In an aticle describing how cable has infiltrated the telecom business and how the Telecoms have been hit:

    "Our industry and our business is going to change more in the next five years than it has during the last 20 combined," says Duane Ackerman, the chairman and chief executive of BellSouth Corp., the local phone company in nine states.


    The word combined. Why add that since the "last 20 years" is already combined?

    I guess I am nitpicking.
     
  14. SixofNine

    SixofNine Jedi Sage Staff Member

    "Combined" adds emphasis but I agree, it's not necessary.

    What I don't like about that sentence is:

    "Our industry and our business is going to ..."

    Two nouns separated by "and" make the subject plural and therefore the sentence should read:

    "Our industry and our business are going to..."

    Brian
     
  15. ethics

    ethics Pomp-Dumpster Staff Member

    Good catch as well.
     
  16. Fiona

    Fiona Veteran Member

    brian beat me to it... I couldnt even get to combined with that eyesore in the first line.
    This and that = they = are :)
     
  17. Fiona

    Fiona Veteran Member

    actually combined may be appropriate, although it's hard to correct such poor grammar without rewriting the entire piece ;)

    He could have been understood as saying there was not a time in 20 years... had he not said combined. (i think)
     
  18. SixofNine

    SixofNine Jedi Sage Staff Member

    And this is the Chairman and CEO of BellSouth! Feh!

    OT: That is a good article on the challenges that the Baby Bells face today and the inroads that cable companies have made into the phone service market.

    Brian
     
  19. ethics

    ethics Pomp-Dumpster Staff Member

    Yah, agree. It was long as hell but well worth the read.
     
  20. Sacchiridites

    Sacchiridites Banned

    Worst case I've ever seen:

    Beavercreek's
    Dick's
    Best

    A shopping center sign. The center is in Beavercreek (a town). Dick's is/was a sporting goods store. Best... another store.

    It was grammatically correct, at least. But I cannot vouch for it's veracity.

    :) Cie
     

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