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Grammar Questions

Discussion in 'Issues Around the World' started by ethics, Aug 20, 2004.

  1. ethics

    ethics Pomp-Dumpster Staff Member

    Reading a book on grammar and I am not sure about few phrases. The book gives you an example of what not to do but doesn't follow up with a correct version.

    So here's the wrong version of the phrase I am looking to get help with:

    Adult Learner's Week

    The above is weong for where the apostrophe is placed. However, where's the right place?

    My guess is Adult Learners' Week.

    Wrong way: Citizens Advice Bureau. Right way: Citizens' Advice Bureau?

    Wrong way: Mens Toilets. Right way: Mens' Toilets?

    Wrong way: Ladie's hairdresser. Right way: Ladies' hairdresser?
     
  2. Sir Joseph

    Sir Joseph Registered User

  3. ethics

    ethics Pomp-Dumpster Staff Member

    That's the book I am quoting and reading, SJ.
     
  4. Violet1966

    Violet1966 Stand and Deliver Staff Member

    Isn't the proper use of grammar, so much fun? *sticking finger down throat*
     
  5. ethics

    ethics Pomp-Dumpster Staff Member

    OH I love it. I am so into to the rules and exceptions it's making my poor wife go crazy. ;)
     
  6. SixofNine

    SixofNine Jedi Sage Staff Member

    To make a plural noun possessive (e.g., "men"), add an apostrophe to the word. If the plural does not end in an s, then add an apostrophe plus s (e.g., "men's").

    Enjoy! :)

    Brian
     
  7. ethics

    ethics Pomp-Dumpster Staff Member

    If the plural does not end in an s, then add an apostrophe plus s (e.g., "men's").
    ===========================

    Men is plural though, is it not? YOu can't have a Men's Room or a Men's Toilet, or can you?
     
  8. joseftu

    joseftu ORIGINAL Pomp-Dumpster

    Yes, that's right--unless it's only one adult learner being honored in this week--unlikely.

    Right again (except see above--there is an unlikely alternate possibility).
    Nope, Men's Toilets.

    Yep, that's it.
     
  9. joseftu

    joseftu ORIGINAL Pomp-Dumpster

    Men is plural--but it doesn't end in -s (like "ladies"). So you add the apostrophe and the s. Men's Room and Men's Toilet are correct.
     
  10. ethics

    ethics Pomp-Dumpster Staff Member

    Actually, ignore my question above, Brian, I think I got it as to why Men's would be the proper way. There needs to be an "s" at the end of "Mens" in order for it to be "Mens'".
     
  11. ethics

    ethics Pomp-Dumpster Staff Member

    Yah, I had a light blulb finally after your first post.

    Thanks for the help!
     
  12. Frodo Lives

    Frodo Lives Luke, I am NOT your father!

    What is 'wrong' with this sentence? :haha:
     
  13. ethics

    ethics Pomp-Dumpster Staff Member

    I am studying Chinese as well, Frodo.
     
  14. Violet1966

    Violet1966 Stand and Deliver Staff Member

    I have a love/hate relationship with proper grammar. I love to get it right, and hate when I don't :(

    I really was into it in school, but still make mistakes and it bugs me.

    Good for you for brushing up on it :thumbsup:
     
  15. Sharondippity

    Sharondippity Sweetness and Light

    I can still diagram a sentence. This has opened countless doors for me in my stellar career. :cool:
     
  16. Violet1966

    Violet1966 Stand and Deliver Staff Member

    rofl :lol: rofl

    All those [] and {} and () made me nutso in grammar class. Oh even though it was so long ago...I remember it well :augh:
     
  17. Sir Joseph

    Sir Joseph Registered User

    The real question, Leon, is where do you stand with regards to the Oxford comma? (That's the comma that is placed before a preposition, such as: and, or or but. Some people write it as: and, or, or but, except those people are evil.)
     
  18. SixofNine

    SixofNine Jedi Sage Staff Member

    Good question, Sir Joe, but let's call those words conjunctions, not prepostions. :)

    My guidance is that you can choose either but you should be consistent.

    Brian
     
  19. ethics

    ethics Pomp-Dumpster Staff Member


    Big proponent. I know the Brits are not big fans but that's the way I was taught. Besides, it seems to work better.

    For example:

    Leon goes to the spa and sees red, white, green, and blue towels.

    The above clearly demonstrates that there are three towels of different color.

    Leon goes to the spa and sees red, white, green and blue towels. Is not as descriptive. One red towel, one white, and one green and blue?
     
  20. Sir Joseph

    Sir Joseph Registered User

    In that case there might be a need for the comma. What about, "I will count to three: one, two and three." In that case a comma clearly is not needed.
    Brian, I don't see how it's called a conjunction. If I use the word or, it's clearly not a conjunction.
     

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