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Gotta Wonder if Trump or Kelly Had Immigrants in Their Family Tree

Discussion in 'Society and Culture' started by ShinyTop, Feb 6, 2018.

  1. Susan Addams

    Susan Addams Unregistered User

    Well most of Canada lives within a short distance of the US-CA border. I have Canadian friends and relatives and I notice no serious differences between myself and my friends and family, although I picked my friends and my family picked me so perhaps there is a built in acceptance. One of my best Internet BFFs lives in Toronto and we've met a few times. I have relatives in SK and ON.
     
  2. Allene

    Allene Registered User

    Slightly off-topic, I found out last November that I actually have dual citizenship (Canadian and American) and have had it since 2009. I became an American citizen in 1975. At that time, the United States offered dual citizenship, but Canada did not. Then two years later in 1977 they adopted dual citizenship, but didn't make it retroactive until 2009. If I am widowed, I'll be able to go back to my hometown where three of my siblings live and where I still have old friends I've kept in touch with for the almost 50 years I've been in the U.S.
     
  3. Allene

    Allene Registered User

    There isn't a huge difference between Canadian and American people. In general, I think Canadians are a bit more reserved than Americans. I find western Canada more American than where I grew up (Cape Breton Island). Cape Breton and Newfoundland have their own cultures and their own regional accents. One difference I've had pointed out to me for Canada versus the United States is in the area of innovation. Canadians will tend to work on improving something, while Americans will invent something new. The countries political systems are of course very different. Also Canada has been described as a mosaic as opposed to America's melting pot (which hasn't been melting so well lately).
     
  4. Susan Addams

    Susan Addams Unregistered User

    LOL! ;)
     
  5. Arc

    Arc Full Member

    If you haven't already done so get a Canadian Passport.
     
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  6. MemphisMark

    MemphisMark Old School Conservative

    Speaking of US and Canada, I used to read adventure novels back in the 80's. I was reading Clive Cussler (Raise the Titanic) a lot until his stories became too outlandishly formulaic.

    The story(Night Probe!) that relates to this was a secret treaty between Great Britain and the US to "sell" Canada to us to raise money in 1914. When The Hero found this document, the President revealed this treaty during a big speech and announced the formation of "The United States of Canada."
     
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  7. Susan Addams

    Susan Addams Unregistered User

    I wonder sometimes if Canada and US could ever combine except I'm pretty sure the major sticking factor would be that Canada wouldn't want to be part of the circus we call America. For sure they are our best neighbors. Oddly, I feel that UK is America's best ally. Funny how two brothers could duke it out and end up being closer afterwards. I just know for sure that if US ever needs UK or UK needs US that the other will be there. Of course the same could be said for Canada. If any country ever attacks Canada it's for sure that US would mount an immediate response. If the US were attacked with nukes I'm sure Canada would launch their nukes in retaliation. That last part is a joke you know. ;)

    In practicality US would protect Mexico too if Mexico were attacked. Our response more or less would be, "Not in our back yard!"

    In reality the US may interfere a lot in foreign affairs, but US is also the lynchpin that holds many alliances together. ANZUS comes to mind. Israel too. If I remember my history right (it's my weakest subject) we also protect South America against threats from outside the hemisphere.

    We may be a bit of a tarnished country but when our friends need us we are there for them.
     
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  8. Allene

    Allene Registered User

    My application arrived in Ottawa a week ago. Talk about red tape! I had to send everything to my brother in Calgary, who was my guarantor and had to sign my photos and fill out a section. Then it went out the same day via courier. I expect it to go smoothly because, in addition to sending them my birth certificate, they also asked if I had ever had a Canadian passport in the past and if so what was the number. Fortunately, I have kept my old passport that expired in 1972, so I could provide the number. I paid for the 10-year version because passports tend to get more expensive as time goes by. I will keep my American passport as well. They just announced a price increase, but mine is good until 2023.
     
  9. Allene

    Allene Registered User

    LOL! We actually had someone on this forum years ago, who went on and on about absorbing Canada into the United States. He was an immigrant to Canada from Asia. After this went on for a long time, I blew up at him.
     
  10. Susan Addams

    Susan Addams Unregistered User

    I've been thinking of renewing my passport too. I guess it's a good thing I still have the expired one.
     
  11. Allene

    Allene Registered User

    You are spot-on about the circus viewpoint. Try watching the news up in Canada and then switch to an American channel. Americans are always worked up into a frenzy over something or other and not always without reason. The larger population in the U.S. contributes to it.

    Ha, ha about Canada's nukes!!! That'll be the day! My folks and others I know back home have never been anti-American. So many people up there have or had relatives in what they used to call "the Boston states." My husband loves to go up there on summer vacations because he is always treated so warmly.

    Yes, it is interesting about the UK/US bond. I often think about that. I also realize that it's US power that keeps this continent from being gobbled up by our enemies. I love this country, and if I eventually leave, I'll miss many things about the United States. I've had a good life here.

     
  12. Allene

    Allene Registered User

    Yes, it might reduce the red tape a bit, because it shows where you were born.
     
  13. Susan Addams

    Susan Addams Unregistered User

    Oh I have my birth certificate too. It shows that yes indeed I was actually born! ;)

    One thing, if I ever decide I want to impersonate myself I have all the documentation I need and it's all on genuine paper! :D
     
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  14. MemphisMark

    MemphisMark Old School Conservative

    It was called the Monroe Doctrine, where the US protected the rest of the Americas from external colonialism and exploitation. Starting about 1898, it was redefined more towards protecting multiculturalism. In 1948, the Organization of American States (OAS) was born from it.
     
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  15. Susan Addams

    Susan Addams Unregistered User

    Yeah, that's the one: The Monroe Doctrine. Looks like we told UK, ES, FR, etc. to butt out.

    Looks like we wanted to be the only ones butting into South America. I heard stories about I.T.T. taking over small countries. Probably US government collusion.
     
  16. Arc

    Arc Full Member

    I've considered Minnesota Canada's eleventh province for a long time now.
     
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  17. Allene

    Allene Registered User

    Why is that? Because of cold winters? Or because of genealogical links to Canada? There's at least one person in my father's family who went there in the 1800s.
     
  18. Arc

    Arc Full Member

    From a broad general perspective, their politics and much of their culture are similar to Canada's. (Yeah, I know that the providences like the states in the US vary a lot in specifics...but overall on the lifestyle and values point of view.) A lot of them even talk like Canadians.

    ADDEMDUM: For my comparison, I don't count Quebec as part of Canada. :)
     
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  19. Allene

    Allene Registered User

    Thanks, Arc. That gives me something to think about. Almost every time we fly back from the East Coast, we go to Minneapolis-St. Paul for a brief layover and then take the final plane to Spokane (3 hours), but I've never been outside the airport.

    Tell me about Quebec!!! They don't count themselves as one of us either. One of the first people I met from there (while working in Toronto in the mid-60s) informed me that I was an English Canadian. I was shocked! Then I said, "I'm not English! I'm Scottish!" She still insisted I was English, so from her point of view, the entire country was divided into the French in Quebec and the ENGLISH in the rest of the country. I was in Montreal once for a few days. That wasn't bad. But Quebec City in the 1980s wasn't exactly friendly to English-speaking tourists.Thankfully, the other French people I know in the Atlantic provinces aren't like that. Those are the Acadians, cousins to Louisiana's Cajuns.

     
  20. Susan Addams

    Susan Addams Unregistered User

    What's the deal about French and Quebecois hating English speaking Canadians and Americans? Don't they realize that because if not for US and Canada's participation in WW II the French would be speaking German as their national language today?

    I really want to tour EU one day (especially the Mediterranean coast) but I'm dreading touring France. However, how could I visit EU and not see the Louvre? And I really love French food. French country food like Julia Child cooks. Cooked. Whatever.
     
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